Navigator






A Handley Page Hastings at Chivenor.  The cargo loading doors are at the rear left side of the fuselage.  The cumbersome and heavy removable loading ramp, when fitted, extended towards the tail.  Because of the angle of the parked aircraft, extra care had to be taken when handling wheeled loads such as Landrovers and trailers.  I know of at least one occasion when, through lack of adequate caution, a Landrover rolled backwards, pinning a member of the loading team against the rear bulkhead of the cargo bay, and seriously injuring him.
RAF Mauripur 1955.  A Dutch Marine Martin Mariner arrives for an overnight stop.  Many different aircraft types of foreign air forces were handled by RAF Air Movements personnel.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955.  Varsitys on the flight line.  This aircraft was used extensively for short haul freighting.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955.  USAF B29's - The Americans were frequent visitors, taking advantage of the RAF facilities.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955. The Valetta transport aircraft, also known as "The Pig"

(Photo by John Holloway)

Blackburn Beverley prototype WZ189 seen here in September 1953, the same year as its first flight.  When it entered service it was the largest aircraft in the RAF.

The Casevac Ramp was used to offload patients from the Hastings in the  mid 1950's  It was constructed locally using a 3-Ton Bedford truck chassis. This one was at RAF Mauripur, Pakistan.  We are told that there was a similar one at RAF Changi in Singapore.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Staging Post Mauripur 1955.  US Air Force C124 Globemasters were regular visitors.  Some were bringing in grain for the Pakistanis, while others were transporting French troops home from French Indo China (now known as Vietnam).

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955. The US Navy C121 Constellations were regular visitors. They used to arrive mid  Sunday morning from Palam, stop for an hour or so and then fly on to Dharan.  They returned on Monday on their way to the Far East.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955.  USAF DC4 Skymaster.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Staging Post Mauripur 1955.  US Navy Constellation

(Photo by John Holloway)

Karachi Airport 1955/56. 
A BOAC/ Skyways York Freighter.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Staging Post Mauripur 1955. The RPAF VIP Viking was the personal aircraft of the Prime Minister of Pakistan,  Quaid-e-Azam Ali Jinnah. The original crew were RAF. It was replaced in 1956 by a Viscount.  The Aircraft now sits pride-of-place in the PAF Museum at PAF Faisal, which in RAF days was RAF Drigh Road. As an aside,  "Lawrence of Arabia"  Lt Col T E Lawrence, served in the RAF as an AC2 at RAF Drigh Road.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955/56. The Hastings was on an AOC inspection tour of the UKH routes to the Far East and Australia.  It was fitted with plush seats and hydraulically operated steps.  The only person that I can remember on it was the then Wing Commander Johnnie Johnson who later became OC Aden Command.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955/56.  An RAF Pembroke

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955/56.   This French Air Force Priviteer was one of four returning home from French Indo China, which is now known as Vietnam

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955/56.   This RAF Shackleton was on its way to Ceylon (Sri Lanka) on exercise.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955/56. Air Movements 
Alistair McDiarmid.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Mauripur 1955/56.   Bert Brazier & Dickie Dowel.

(Photo by John Holloway)

RAF Dishforth, North Yorks, 1951 - Troops boarding a Hastings bound for Korea.  I believe this was taken at RAF Dishforth, North Yorks and the troops possibly are from Catterick heading for Korea in the very early 50s.

(Photo courtesy of Ian Berry)

 

Troops embarking into the boom of a Beverley, Abingdon 1959.  Bit of a teaser this, I'm convinced it's RAF Abingdon as that is where 47 Squadron, the first to be equipped with the Beverley in 1956, operated from.  Maybe our more mature readers can shed some light on it...

(Photo courtesy of Ian Berry)